Dirty Water Records

Taking Music Backwards Into Tomorrow

Filtering by Tag: Record Hunter

Record Hunter: You Ain't Treatin' Me Right c/w The Long Road - Mac Curtis (King, 1956, USA)

Mac Curtis, born in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1939, began playing guitar at the age of 12. At the age of 15 a show at his high school was shut down due to "sexually suggestive movements" on stage. But he got signed up to King Records pretty soon afterwards, and maybe that helped! This is his third single. But any of those first six releases of his on the King label are worth grabbing when you see 'em.

Record Hunter: Our Love Will Still Be There - The Troggs (Fontana, 1966, French picture sleeve EP)

Okay, so this track isn't the "a-side" on this EP. The first song is "With a Girl Like You". On the other side are "Jingle Jangle" and "I Want You". But the caveman stomp of the latter track is already on my shelves of seven inch vinyl. And "Our Love Will Still Be There" is my reason for buying this French EP.  One of my favourite bands ever, the Troggs are world famous for "Wild Thing", of course. But every one of their 45s is worth having, in my opinion. Even their 1970s ones, like "In The Summertime", in which Reg Presley's lascivious snarl is still fully present. On this track the fuzz guitar totally makes it for me. I can imagine all kinds of bands making soft, lovey-dovey, versions of "Our Love Will Still Be There". But the Troggs give me what I want - full on sixties punk attitude on a love song. What can be better?

Record Hunter: Slow Death c/w Tallahasse Lassie - Flamin’ Groovies (UA, 1972, German pressing with picture sleeve)

Here's one I bought off Robin Wills of the Barracudas (a spare copy, obviously). He says, 'This is the single that started it all for me. It hit this 12 year old full face and the love story has never ended. I still play this single over and over and 40 years later it still sends shivers down the backbone. The overall attitude, the riff, the lyrics, those pounding drums, the amazing Dave Edmunds production (just check the best hand clap sound ever on the third verse) - this single has and does it all...and for me is still the most perfect single I've ever heard or experienced.'

Record Hunter: Do The Slauson Shuffle – The Olympics (Tri-Disc, USA, 1963)

The Olympics are best known for their big hit in 1958, "Western Movies", but they carried on through the sixties recording soul and r&b and staying pretty much up to date in their sound. "Do the Slauson Shuffle" is from 1963 and ought to be enough to get anyone up on the floor and dancing. "Good Lovin'" (Loma), made famous by the Young Rascals' cover version is also worth keeping an eye out for, as well as "Mine Exclusively" (Mirwood).

Record Hunter: In the Cover of Night – Don & Jerry (Fabor, USA, 1965)

Don Griffin and Jerry Strickland were primarily song writers, out of Louisiana, but they got together with California band The Fugitives and made a couple of 45s in 1965-66. This, the first of two singles, came out in the spring of ’65. (Ron Gray and the Countdowns recorded this song shortly afterwards for N-Joy label and is a pretty good version too.)

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