Dirty Water Records

Taking Music Backwards Into Tomorrow

Filtering by Tag: Garage Rock

Word For Music: The Sons of Bido Lito "Avalanche"

After reading the name of the band you don’t know what to expect, but if you jump that hurdle, you’re in for some good music.

The Sons of Bido Lito serve up some scuzzy music which takes you all the way back to the sixties in places, as they Demand your attention with their attackive riff. The music video alone is eerie and psycadelic enough, but with the music, it’s hard to avoid.

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Fungal Punk: Los Bengala "Incluso Festivos"

It goes without saying that when I am requested to review any produce from the Dirty Water Records stable I get slightly aroused.   The reason for this perverse reaction (of which I make no apology) is that, over the years, the label has given me untold delight with quality release after quality release.  In fact, along with Do The Dog Records, I would name these peddlers of noise as the very best labels to have tickled my tastebuds in recent times.

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Dynamite Magazine: Los Bengala "Incluso Festivos"

Los Bengala are probably not a classic rock'n'roll band: They are a duo from Northern Spain, which initially took place in the region soul and funk , but now obviously wanted to have a little fun. The label Dirty Water discovered the guitarist and the drummer on stage in London and was instantly in love with this snotty - trashy sound.

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Record Hunter: Whatcha Gonna Do About It c/w Always Running Around - The Evil (Capitol, German pressing, 1967)

The original release of this Miami, Florida band was on the Living Legends label in 1966, which apparently has more feedback and distortion than the re-mixed version that came out when Capitol licensed it a few months later, expecting it to be a big hit. I have a German pressing with what is possibly the most boring picture sleeve in the world (a photo of the Capitol Records building in Los Angeles) - it wasn't issued in the UK. I used to think that the Evil was the same group under a different name that was earlier called the Montells, because an album on the Australian Corduroy Records put both bands on the same reissue LP (in the mid-1990s). They have their similarities, including having the same bass player. But they were separate entitites. And the Evil is the better band by some way (though don't let that stop you buying anything by the Montells should you be lucky enough to chance upon anything by them). If you want to know more about The Evil and sixties Florida bands in general see if you can track down a copy of Jeff Lemlich's fabulous book "Savage Lost (Florida Garage Bands - The '60s And Beyond)".

Record Hunter: Don't Need You No More c/w Boss - The Rumblers (Downey, USA, September 1962)

"Boss" was the a-side but I more usually play the flip, the excellent "I Don't Need You No More". I guess that "Boss" had the bigger impact at the time because they followed it up with "Boss Strikes Back" (on the nationally distributed Dot label, which re-issued "Boss"/"I Don't Need You No More" six months after its original release, which came out at that same time in the UK on the London label).

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The RingMaster Review: The Arrogants "Introducing ..."

The first striking thing, apart from four stomping songs, about Introducing… the new EP from French garage rockers The Arrogants, is the passion and obvious relish the band has for their music and its seeds. The release is a potent and energetic encounter which in presence alone gets the listener swiftly involved and feeling the heart of the band. The fact that the songs are also raw and vibrant slices of feverish enterprise does the success of the EP no harm either.

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Peppermint Iguana: The Revellions "The Revellions"

From the psychedelic packaging to the sixties garage surf punk sound, this lot are definitely a blast from the past, today. You can almost hear the surf crashing in on the beach at some west coast late night rave up as they mix the 13 th Floor Elevators with Dick Dale. If they have ever set foot in the US is unknown, they seem to have been quite capable of brewing this little potion up from the confines of their hometown of Dublin.

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Record Hunter: In the Cover of Night – Don & Jerry (Fabor, USA, 1965)

Don Griffin and Jerry Strickland were primarily song writers, out of Louisiana, but they got together with California band The Fugitives and made a couple of 45s in 1965-66. This, the first of two singles, came out in the spring of ’65. (Ron Gray and the Countdowns recorded this song shortly afterwards for N-Joy label and is a pretty good version too.)

Dirty Water Records London